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CA Justice Dept Goes After Police, Not Suspects, In Officer-Involved Shootings

Attorney General Rob Bonta speaks after he was sworn in as California's 34th Attorney General, Friday, April 23, 2021 in Sacramento, Calif. Bonta, 49, is the first Filipino American to head the California Department of Justice. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)
Attorney General Rob Bonta speaks after he was sworn in as California's 34th Attorney General, Friday, April 23, 2021 in Sacramento, Calif. Bonta, 49, is the first Filipino American to head the California Department of Justice. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)

Feckless in its effort to keep criminals in prison, and prevent crime rates from spiraling skyward, the State of California is now going after the police.

 

California Attorney General Rob Bonta (photo above) is setting up new rules to investigate officer-involved shootings that result in the death of an unarmed civilian. 

 

The California Department of Justice will now investigate all such incidents and review them for potential criminal liability, not on the part of the suspected criminal, but on the part of the police officers.

 

Previously, those incidents have been handled primarily by local law enforcement and district attorneys. 

 

But state oversight is designed to hold police culpable for officer-involved shootings, even though the suspects determine the amount of force a police officer has to employ to take a suspect into custody.

 

The California Department of Justice estimates 40 to 50 officer-involved shootings each year will require the involvement of the California Attorney General’s office.

 

Attorney General Rob Bonta speaks after he was sworn in as California’s 34th Attorney General, Friday, April 23, 2021 in Sacramento, Calif. Bonta, 49, is the first Filipino American to head the California Department of Justice. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool)

July 8th 2021

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